I am a library paraprofessional with unabashed passion for literature, knitting, and clever wordplay.

Here you will find:
- Library advocacy
- DIY and craft projects
- Science fiction
- Gaming
- Adorable animal pictures
- Unapologetic feminism and intersectionality
- Recipes
- Other cool stuff

23rd July 2014

Quote reblogged from I Like the Sparklies with 1,433 notes

Lord knows the Democratic Party is far from perfect. But House Democrats, when they were in the majority, at least understood that the government had to function, even if its policies were not those they preferred. When Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) was speaker, for example, she made certain that bills funding the occupation of Iraq made it through the House, even though a majority of Democrats bitterly opposed the war.

Today’s Republican Party opposes the Affordable Care Act, so it refuses to work with the Obama administration in legislating technical fixes that would make the law work more smoothly. Is this in any sense patriotic? Having lost battles over the law in Congress and the Supreme Court, don’t Republicans have an obligation to make it serve their constituents as well as possible?

Both parties used to understand the need to invest in infrastructure for reasons of competitiveness and safety. Both parties used to understand that there could be no serious threat to send the Treasury into default. Both parties used to cheer the kind of good economic news we heard Thursday — 288,000 new jobs in June, unemployment down to 6.1 percent.

But now, one party — the GOP — cares more about ideology, reelection and opposing Obama’s every initiative than about the well-being of the nation. It is scant comfort, on Independence Day, to remember that the republic has survived worse.

Robinson: This July 4, governing in the spirit of revenge (via kileyrae)

You know, it just occurred to me, back when I did office work, if I’d refused to do my job for so much as a day, I’d have been fired.

You?

(via tamorapierce)

Tagged: congresspolitics

Source: Washington Post

23rd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Le ciel tumultueux with 94 notes

lecieltumultueux:

bulbaaasaur:

the-library-lady:

This is accurate.

Good to know. I’m starting on-call at a public library this week and have only done academic reference before. Good to know it won’t be wholly different. Except for the child one. I don’t think I’ve ever had someone lose a child in the library before.

Someone called to ask for the time last week.

Semi-accurate. The “what is the book/movie I’m thinking of?” section needs to be much bigger.

lecieltumultueux:

bulbaaasaur:

the-library-lady:

This is accurate.

Good to know. I’m starting on-call at a public library this week and have only done academic reference before. Good to know it won’t be wholly different. Except for the child one. I don’t think I’ve ever had someone lose a child in the library before.

Someone called to ask for the time last week.

Semi-accurate. The “what is the book/movie I’m thinking of?” section needs to be much bigger.

Tagged: librariestumblarianspublic service desklibrary patrons

Source: twitter.com

23rd July 2014

Quote reblogged from SCRIBBLES with 38,033 notes

If you can’t like Captain America anymore because he’s black, there’s a word for that.
Dean Trippe (via t1mco)

Tagged: captain americaracismcomicsmarvel

Source: t1mco

23rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from I Like the Sparklies with 151,467 notes

tamorapierce:

always-b-e-strong:

roqueofspades:

the-blog-of-a-nerdy-fangirl:

This is the cutest thing to ever exist ever. Everyone else go home this is the winner

WHY IS THIS SO FLIPDOODLING CUTE

This is so funny!! Made my day!! :D

I want a Sheldon of my very own!

Tagged: sheldon the tiny dinosauradorable

Source: hugs-sweets

23rd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Not Your Stereotypical Librarian with 7,424 notes

If I ever get sad, I just remember that Joss Whedon actually did this

Tagged: angel the seriesjoss whedondance of joy

Source: lisathevampireslayer

23rd July 2014

Quote reblogged from Fat, feminist, and furious with 13,660 notes

Honestly, it’s quite astonishing how much misery this movie manages to pack into two hours of mostly action sequences and espionage subplots, particularly since Captain America is supposedly one of the “lighter” superheroes, compared to the unending grimdarkness of Batman. I guess this is the difference between “manpain” and “a man in legitimate emotional pain.”

The Tragedy of Bucky Barnes

this was just maybe flat out my favorite part of this review because hi, true

(via defcontwo)

Tagged: captain americawinter soldiermoviesmarvel

Source: defcontwo

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from SCRIBBLES with 65,871 notes

downeyjred:

Tagged: tina feypresident obamaaffordable care actcomedy

Source: feynificent

22nd July 2014

Post reblogged from Not Your Stereotypical Librarian with 68,234 notes

deathbedscene:

having siblings is weird bc like one minute u want to strangle them with their own intestines and then later ur singing dramatic duets together

Tagged: familysiblingslife with intrepidheroineoh sister dear

Source: deathbedscene

22nd July 2014

Post reblogged from Fat, feminist, and furious with 96,330 notes

dannyrandy:

i can’t believe people get so angry about a bisexual spider-man. whatever. have your shitty bi/homophobic opinions. you’re an asshole anyway. i just can’t believe you’re robbing everyone of all the glorious ‘swings both ways’ jokes

Tagged: comicsspider-manbisexuality

Source: dannyrandy

22nd July 2014

Photo reblogged from Occupation: Girl with 1,236,436 notes

swiggityswagurfab:






This guy would survive a horror movie.

This guy would survive a horror movie.

Every single time this comes up on my dash it gets funnier. Like I just fell of of my bed from laughing so hard

He hit him with a lamp. 

I love his freedom pants.

im crying omg

swiggityswagurfab:


This guy would survive a horror movie.

This guy would survive a horror movie.

Every single time this comes up on my dash it gets funnier. Like I just fell of of my bed from laughing so hard

He hit him with a lamp.

I love his freedom pants.

im crying omg

Tagged: horrormoviesfunny

Source: crrocs

22nd July 2014

Post reblogged from Occupation: Girl with 79,136 notes

hotdadcalendar:

I’m actually concerned for boys who complain about how different girls look without makeup. Like did you think eyeshadow permanently alters a girls eyelid? Are you frightened when people change clothes

Tagged: sexismgender

Source: hotdadcalendar

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from 21st Goddamn Century with 248,470 notes

chvrizard:

unclefather:

this is the wrong color tricycle mom I hate you so much this is the worst birthday ever

Every time I see this picture it has a different caption and they just keep getting better and better

chvrizard:

unclefather:

this is the wrong color tricycle mom I hate you so much this is the worst birthday ever

Every time I see this picture it has a different caption and they just keep getting better and better

Tagged: raccoonsanimalsadorable

Source: yeahiwasintheshit

21st July 2014

Link reblogged from i like your stuffs with 286 notes

http://ilikeyourstuffs.tumblr.com/post/91887768363/the-diebrarian-suziedowninthequiet-i-found →

the-diebrarian:

suziedowninthequiet:

I found this extremely helpful "What His Favorite Superhero Reveals About Him" article (thanks Cosmo!) and in the spirit of equality and fairness, thought I’d compile a guide for men so they know what a woman’s favorite superheroine says about…

Tagged: superheroessexismcosmo

Source: suziedowninthequiet

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Fat, feminist, and furious with 165,525 notes

cynicallibrarian:

catbountry:

ex-wife:

did-you-kno:

Source 

"When I got my first cat, it changed me. There is something about holding a cat that makes your anger melt away. And if someone does something that upsets me—I have to remember my cat. I can’t keep my cat if I get into trouble.”

"I asked if Major Cabanaw had concerns for the safety of the cats. “Of course, we always want to ensure the safety of the cats, and the staff is great about keeping an eye out for them. But mostly, it’s the offenders keeping them safe. I have never once seen an offender kill his own cat. We screen them to be sure they have no history of animal abuse. But I’ll tell you this, there was a guy killed in here because he had spit soda pop onto someone else’s cat.”"
Wow.

If I ever wind up in jail, it will probably be for killing someone who hurt my cats. Hopefully they’ll put me in this jail.

cynicallibrarian:

catbountry:

ex-wife:

did-you-kno:

Source 

"When I got my first cat, it changed me. There is something about holding a cat that makes your anger melt away. And if someone does something that upsets me—I have to remember my cat. I can’t keep my cat if I get into trouble.”

"I asked if Major Cabanaw had concerns for the safety of the cats. “Of course, we always want to ensure the safety of the cats, and the staff is great about keeping an eye out for them. But mostly, it’s the offenders keeping them safe. I have never once seen an offender kill his own cat. We screen them to be sure they have no history of animal abuse. But I’ll tell you this, there was a guy killed in here because he had spit soda pop onto someone else’s cat.”"

Wow.

If I ever wind up in jail, it will probably be for killing someone who hurt my cats. Hopefully they’ll put me in this jail.

Tagged: indianaprisoncats

Source: didyouknowblog.com

21st July 2014

Photo reblogged from Librarian Revolution with 8,726 notes

theinnkeeperlibrarian:

holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.
These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.
These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.
An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.
I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.
At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:
“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”
Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.
Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.
It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.
The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.
At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:
How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?
These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.


This is important.

I had a roommate who used to do this until I threatened to break his nose. Then the narrative changed into me being really touchy.
If any story about it comes up at a party, I will inevitably have 5-10 people ask why it’s a problem (since, you know, he’s not getting anything sexual out of it). Because again, the dude’s gratification is valued over the lady’s wish to not be touched without her consent.

theinnkeeperlibrarian:

holisticsexualhealth:

Gay Men’s Sexism and Women’s Bodies

At a recent presentation, I asked all of the gay male students in the room to raise their hand if in the past week they touched a woman’s body without her consent. After a moment of hesitation, all of the hands of the gay men in the room went up. I then asked the same gay men to raise their hand if in the past week they offered a woman unsolicited advice about how to “improve” her body or her fashion. Once again, after a moment of hesitation, all of the hands in the room went up.

These questions came after a brief exploration of gay men’s relationship to American fashion and women’s bodies. That dialogue included recognizing that gay men in the United States are often hailed as the experts of women’s fashion and by proxy women’s bodies. In addition to this there is a dominant logic that suggests that because gay men have no conscious desire to be sexually intimate with women, our uninvited touching and groping (physical assault) is benign.

These attitudes have led many gay men to feel curiously comfortable critiquing and touching women’s bodies at whim.  What’s unique about this is not the male sense of ownership to women’s bodies—that is somewhat common.  What’s curious is the minimization of these acts by gay men and many women because the male perpetuating the act is or is perceived to be gay.

An example: I was at a gay club in Atlanta with a good friend of mine who is a heterosexual black woman. While dancing in the club, a white gay male reached out and grabbed both her breasts aggressively. Shocked, she pushed him away immediately. When we both confronted him he told us:  “It’s no big deal, I’m gay, I don’t want her– I was just having fun.” We expressed our frustrations to him and demanded he apologize, but he simply refused. He clearly felt entitled to touch her body and could not even acknowledge the fact that he had assaulted her.

I have experienced this attitude as being very common amongst gay men. It should also be noted that in this case, she was a black woman and he a white gay male, which makes this an eyebrow-raising dynamic as it invokes the psychological history of white men’s entitlement to black women’s bodies. However it has been my experience that this dynamic of assault with gay men and women also persists within racial groups.

At another presentation, I told this same story to the audience. Almost instantly, several young women raised up their hands to be called upon. Each of them recounted a different story with a similar theme. One young woman told a story that stuck with me:

“I was feeling really cute in this outfit I put together. Then I see this gay guy I knew from class, but not very well. I had barely said hi before he began telling me what was wrong with how I looked, how I needed to lose weight, and how if I wanted to get a man I needed to do certain things… In the midst of this, he grabbed my breasts and pushed them together, to tell me how my breasts should look as opposed to how they did.  It really brought me down. I didn’t know how to respond… I was so shocked.”

Her story invoked rage amongst many other women in the audience, and an obvious silence amongst the gay men present. Their silence spoke volumes.  What also seemed to speak volumes, though not ever articulated verbally, was the sense that many of the heterosexual women had not responded (aggressively or otherwise) out of fear of being perceived as homophobic. (Or that their own homophobia, in an aggressive response, would reveal itself.) This, curiously to me, did not seem to be a concern for the lesbian and queer-identified women in the room at all.

Acts like these are apart of the everyday psychological warfare against women and girls that pits them against unrealistic beauty standards and ideals. It is also a part of the culture’s constant message to women that their bodies are not their own.

It’s very disturbing, but in a culture that doesn’t  see gay men who are perceived as “queer” as “men” or as having male privilege, our misogyny and sexist acts are instead read as “diva worship” or “celebrating women”, even when in reality they are objectification, assault and dehumanization.

The unique way our entitlement to women’s physical bodies plays itself out is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to gay cisgender men’s sexism and privilege. This privilege does not make one a bad person any more than straight privilege makes heterosexuals bad people. It does mean that gay men can sometimes be just as unthinkingly hurtful, and unthinkingly a part of a system that participates in the oppression of others, an experience most of us can relate to. Exploration of these dynamics can lead us to query institutional systems and policies that reflect this privilege, nuanced as it is by other identities and social locations.

At the end of my last workshop on gay men’s sexism, I extended a number of questions to the gay men in the audience. I think it’s relevant to extend these same questions now:

How is your sexism and misogyny showing up in your own life, and in your relationships with your female friends, trans, lesbian, queer or heterosexual? How is it showing up in your relationship to your mothers, aunts and sisters?  Is it showing up in your expectations of how they should treat you? How you talk to them? What steps can you take to address the inequitable representation of gay cisgender men in your community as leaders? How do you see that privilege showing up in your organizations and policy, and what can you do to circumvent it? How will you talk to other gay men in your community about their choices and interactions with women, and how will you work to hold them and yourself accountable?

These are just some of the questions we need to be asking ourselves so that we can help create communities where sexual or physical assault, no matter who is doing it, is deemed unacceptable. These are the kinds of questions we as gay men need to be asking ourselves so that we can continue (or for some begin) the work of addressing gender/sex inequity in our own communities, as well as in our own hearts and minds. This is a part of our healing work. This is a part of our transformation. This is a part of our accountability.

This is important.

I had a roommate who used to do this until I threatened to break his nose. Then the narrative changed into me being really touchy.

If any story about it comes up at a party, I will inevitably have 5-10 people ask why it’s a problem (since, you know, he’s not getting anything sexual out of it). Because again, the dude’s gratification is valued over the lady’s wish to not be touched without her consent.

Tagged: objectificationsexismassault

Source: holisticsexualhealth